Labels

aba abba adele AdeptEnglish Al Jazeera alan parsons Aleister Kelman Alejo Lopera amigos ingleses audio audiobooks Aussie English babbel bbc beatles Ben E. King billie holiday bobby mcferrin british council Bruno Mars busuu callan Canguro English cat stevens channel 4 news consonants crown academy of English Daily English Conversation daniel welsch david palencia daway Deep English Dido do don't worry drew badger duolingo Eat Sleep Dream English education el blog para aprender inglés elpais elvis presley english AnyOne english coach chad english course English Language Club EnglishClass101.com engVid EnSimplesPalabras ETJ English euronews experience film frank sinatra gerunds Go Natural English grammar greenpeace homophones idiom idioms imagine infinitives ing inglés americano inglespodcast interactive english irregular plural irregular verbs james blunt james rhodes john lennon jokes jude justin bieber kitchen learning advice learning skills linguamarina listening skills los bravos Luke's English Podcast make math medical advice michael bublé misterduncan mmmEnglish modal verbs moonshadow movie msf NeverAgain news nina simone noums nouns Old 97's oxford online Papa Teach Me past past continuous past simple paul mccartney personal phonetic phrasal verb pink pink floyd pinterest plot podcast poetry pronunciation proverbs question tags quizlet reading richard marx ringo star rosetta stone roy orbison Rudyard Kipling scott young sentences simon & garfunkel song sounds spain story synopsis talking tedx talk test that's english think in english trailer translation used to vaughan Venya Pak verbs video clip voa vocabulary vowels webinglés wlingua would writing youtalk youtube

Thursday, 25 October 2018

How creative should we be?



Introduction

The World Economic Forum forecasts that by 2020, creativity will be in the top three most important skills for future jobs. This is particularly relevant for younger people who will be entering the world of work soon. BBC Learning English's very creative scriptwriter Rob and Neil discuss what it takes to be creative - and they also teach you related vocabulary.


Vocabulary

a creative (noun)
a person whose job is to use a lot of imagination and come up with new ideas, such as someone who works in the media or advertising

legitimately
describes doing something fairly and reasonably

think outside the box
find new ways of doing things

redress the balance
to make things fairer and more equal

lifeblood
the most important thing to make something a success

disparate
very different and unrelated

headspace
when your mind is in a good state and you can think clearly

Transcript
Note: This is not a word for word transcript

Neil
Hello. Welcome to 6 Minute English, I'm Neil.

Rob
And hello, I'm Rob.

Neil
Now Rob, how creative are you?

Rob
Very creative, I think. Creativity is in my bones! Look at this wonderful script that I wrote and we're presenting right now.

Neil
You are what we could call 'a creative' – a noun which means someone with a lot of imagination and ideas. In our job we have create – or make – content that teaches English creatively.

Rob
Creativity is becoming more important for everyone. The World Economic Forum forecasts that by 2020, creativity will be in the top three most important skills for future jobs. This is particularly relevant for younger people who will be entering the world of work soon – and that's what we'll be discussing today. But before we do, Neil, have you created a question for us to answer?

Neil
Yes, and it's about the very creative artist Banksy. He created a well-known piece of artwork that has been in the news recently, but do you know what it is called? Is it…

a)    Girl with Balloon

b)    Girl with Red Balloon

c)    Balloon Girl

Rob
I can see the picture in my head – so I think it's c) Balloon girl.

Neil
OK, and we'll find out the answer later. But now back to our discussion about creativity. Experts say that students need to focus more on creativity to help them get a job. That's perhaps surprising in the UK, when some of our creative industries – that's businesses that make music, art and TV for example – are world famous. We are creative people, Rob!

Rob
Of course, but there's not such a focus on being creative in education now and that might have an effect in the future. It's something Bernadette Duffy, an early years consultant, has been discussing on BBC Radio 4's Bringing up Britain programme. What does she say we have been focussing too much on in schools?

Bernadette Duffy, early years consultant
We focus on the things that are legitimately important but we teach them in a way that makes them easier to measure. I think we need to redress the balance that puts the focus purely on gaining the skills and far far more on actually using them in a creative way because that's what's going to make a difference for the future.

Neil
So Bernadette feels we teach skills in a way that can be easily measured and tested. She says we teach these skills legitimately – which here means fairly and reasonably. But she feels we don't teach a creative approach to learning skills.

Rob
So we mean things like problem solving. I guess, even tasks like data inputting and preparing spreadsheets can be approached creatively. In any job, it's sometimes good to 'think outside the box' or find new ways of doing things.

Neil
Bernadette thinks we should move away from just learning skills and start using these skills creatively – she used the expression 'redress the balance' which means 'change things to make them fairer and more equal'.  

Rob
Well, here at the BBC we have to creative. In fact one of our values states that 'creativity is the lifeblood of our organisation'. Lifeblood here means 'the most important thing to make something a success'.  

Neil
Rob, I can see creativity is in your blood – but on an everyday level how can we all improve our creativity – be more like you?!

Rob
Well, Neil, I'm no expert but Innovation Manager, Nick Skillicorn is. He's also been speaking to the BBC and explaining what we can do to help ourselves. What does he suggest?

Nick Skillicorn, Innovation Manager
On a daily basis, everyone should take fifteen minutes of what I call unfocussed time – time that they're not looking at any screen, time that they can essentially get back into their own head, slow down a bit, and start forming these new connections between disparate ideas that result in divergent new original ideas.

Neil
So we need free time to collect all our different thoughts in our head – what Nick calls disparate ideas to create new and amazing ideas.

Rob
Disparate ideas are very different ideas, all unrelated. And we need what we might call headspace – that's when your mind is in a good state and you can think clearly. For me, I have headspace when I'm lying in the bath or out riding my bike – there are no interruptions. 

Neil
Well, you certainly don't get your ideas sitting at a desk, focussing on one task – we all need some downtime to get creative. But children going into school now will grow up to do a job that doesn't yet exist. And faced with the challenges of AI, automation, green issues and an ageing population, creativity and imagination will be vital.

Rob
Right, well, let's get back to talking about the creativity of Banksy now.

Neil
Ah yes, because earlier I asked you which one of his well-known pieces of artwork has been in the news recently? Is it…

a)    Girl with Balloon

b)    Girl with Red Balloon

c)    Balloon Girl

Rob
And I said c) Balloon Girl. I know it was a girl and a balloon.

Neil
Not quite right, Rob. The artwork is titled 'Girl with Balloon.' This was recently auctioned in London but amazingly shredded in its frame as someone's winning bid was accepted!

Rob
Wow, that's a very creative way to destroy a picture! I will do the same with this script soon but not before we have recapped some of today's vocabulary. Starting with 'a creative' - that's a person whose job is to use a lot of imagination and come up with new ideas, such as someone who works in the media or advertising.

Neil
Then we mentioned legitimately – which describes doing something fairly and reasonably.

Rob
Next we heard the expression 'redress the balance'. This means to make things fairer and more equal.

Neil
We also talked aboutcreativity being the lifeblood of the BBC. Lifeblood here means the most important thing to make something a success. And I know creativity is running through your veins, Rob!

Rob
Thanks, Neil. We also heard the word disparate, meaning very different and unrelated. And we talked about headspace, which is when your mind is in a good state and you can think clearly.

Neil
Before we head off to find some headspace, don't forget to visit our website at bbclearningenglish.com for more great learning English content. That’s all we have time for now. Do join us again though. Goodbye.

Rob
Bye bye!

No comments:

Post a Comment